can someone hack bank account with phone number?

can someone hack bank account with phone number?
Content List
From there, it’s as simple as initiating password resets on accounts associated with that phone number. Facebook, Gmail, Twitter — and more. A hacker can use your hijacked phone number to steal all of your cryptocurrency, take over your vanity Instagram username or maliciously delete all of your data. Can anyone hack your bank account with your phone number or your phone number? To answer this question, we suggest you read this article.


Assuming you have your strong passwords in place and your two-factor authentication set up, you think your accounts are now safe? Think again. There’s much more to be done.

You might think your Social Security or bank account numbers are the most sensitive digits in your life. Nowadays, hackers can do far more damage with little effort using just your cell phone number. But unlike your Social Security number, you’re far less likely to keep your cell phone number a secret — otherwise nobody can contact you!

Whether you’re an AT&T, Verizon, Sprint or T-Mobile customer, every cell phone number can be a target for hackers. And it takes remarkably little effort to wreak havoc to your online life.

Types of bank account hacking and fraud

Knowing the weak spots that hackers look for and the tricks they use can go a long way in protecting you from cyber theft:

• Weak passwords. Using simple, easy to guess passwords can put your accounts at risk.

• Fraudulent texts and phone calls. Beware of any emails or phone calls from numbers claiming to be your bank. They might just be looking to steal your information to access your account.

• Phishing links. Watch out for unfamiliar links in emails or while browsing online. While they might look legitimate, these links and websites are designed to look official to trick you into entering your information.

• Malware. This type of virus can be picked up from sketchy websites and emails, infecting your computer and possibly intercepting your information and passwords.

• Leaks. Websites and banks affected by security breaches can allow unauthorized people to access your info. It’s essential that you use different passwords for all of your online accounts. Otherwise, a breach on one website could affect all of your online accounts.

• Public Wi-Fi. Avoid logging into your bank account on public Wi-Fi, as hackers could use the public connection to intercept your information and access your accounts.

• Social engineering. Some hackers will go the extra mile to access your information by calling your bank and impersonating you. And since most banks will use your personal information to verify your identity, it’s important to not give your personal information to strangers.

• Card scanners. These devices — when placed over an existing, legitimate card scanner — will take a picture of your card and could record your pin. When using an ATM in an unfamiliar location, wiggle the card socket to check for a fraudulent card scanner.

Ensure your account is not vulnerable

Most banking websites allow you to activate a feature called “remember your password” when you log in online. This allows you to skip several layers of security the next time you log in since the bank recognizes your computer’s IPv4 address — a unique identifier for each Internet connection.

However, malware is a tool that hackers use to imitate your IPv4 address in order to gain access to your bank account. And since you usually won’t know that they have control over your computer, it’s best to disable the “remember your computer” feature.

hack bank account

.What to do if your bank account is hacked

If you believe your account has been hacked, there are a few important steps you should take:

1. View and verify account activity. First, go through your account activity to confirm any fraudulent charges. Some legitimate transactions may seem fraudulent if the company does business under a different name.

2. Call your bank. Once you’ve confirmed that your account has been hacked, call your bank to report the fraud. They can help you solve the issue and possibly return funds to your account.

3. Freeze your account. If possible, freeze your bank account online, on the app or by speaking with customer service.

4. Change your pins and passwords. Change your bank account pin to something entirely different and secure. Also, consider changing the passwords to your online banking account, email and other online accounts — and try not to use the same password.

5. Check your credit history. If your bank account is hacked, it’s possible that the hacker tried to open a credit card in your name. Speak with your bank to find out if they can check your credit history for free.

6. File a police report. Finally, consider filing a police report. It’s unlikely that you’ll have any information on the person who hacked you, but reports from multiple victims could increase the chances of the thief being caught. If caught, they could face fines up to $1 million or go to prison for up to 30 years.

?What you can do to protect your phone number

Just like you can apply two-factor authentication to your online accounts, you can add a secondary security code to your cell phone account, too.

You can either call up customer services or do it online. (Many feel more reassured by calling up and talking to someone.) You can ask customer service, for example, to set a secondary password on your account to ensure that only you — the account holder — can make any changes to the account or port out your number.

Every carrier handles secondary security codes differently. You may be limited in your password, passcode or passphrase, but try to make it more than four to six digits. And make sure you keep a backup of the code!

For the major carriers:

AT&T has a guide on how to set up extra security on your account.

T-Mobile allows you to set up a customer passcode.

Verizon explains how you can add a PIN to your account.

Sprint also lets you add an account PIN for greater security.

If your carrier isn’t listed, you might want to check if they employ a similar secondary security code to your account to prevent any abuse. And if they don’t, maybe you should port out your cell phone number to a carrier that does.